Tag: Calibration

Analysis of Ni Laterite Ore

Nickel is one of the most important base metals for modern infrastructure. Over 60 percent of world nickel production (nickel metal based) is used for the making of stainless steel. There are mainly two types of resources for nickel mining – sulfide and laterite (oxide) ores. More than 70 percent of world nickel resources on land are found in laterite ores. Nickel laterite ore deposits are formed by weathering of ultramafic rocks in tropical to subtropical regions. Stratigraphic rock facies of nickel laterite deposit are typically layered upward as follows: serpentinized peridotite – saprolite – transitional rock – limonite – ferricrete. These rock facies are also gradually changed in mineral assemblages and chemical compositions. Nickel is extracted from ores mined from saprolite to limonite layers. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a well-known analytical method to determine chemical composition in materials with high accuracy and simple sample preparation. Therefore, XRF technique is used for process and quality control in many industries. Sample preparation by fusion bead method allows high accuracy analysis of geological samples, because the method completely eliminates sample heterogeneity such as grain size and mineralogical effects, caused by various rock-forming minerals in geological samples. For the analysis of nickel laterites by XRF, high spectral resolution is required to detect trace amount of cobalt, since the wavelength are very close between iron and cobalt so that a large iron peak overlaps to the small cobalt peak in the spectrum. In addition, high sensitivity is required for the analysis of light elements such as magnesium. Wavelength dispersive XRF (WDXRF) can meet both of these requirements. This note demonstrates advanced methods to determine wide range chemical composition of rocks in nickel laterite deposits by fusion method.

Analysisd of Silicate Rocks using the Low dilution Fusion method for Majors and traces

Geochemical analysis for silicate rocks is essential for modern petrology. Concentrations of major and trace components in igneous rock samples provides many kinds of information about rock history such as eruption or solidification, magma evolution, magma genesis and source materials as well as petrographical classification. Use of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for silicate rock analysis has developed for many decades. The XRF technique is currently used as standard analytical method to determine the chemical composition of major elements in silicate rocks. Rock analysis which demands high accuracy requires the fusion method to eliminate sample heterogeneities caused by grain size and mineralogical effect, of various rock-forming minerals. Conventional fusion method has been principally used for determination of major elements in silicate rock but the dilution by flux significantly reduces sensitivities of trace elements. Pressed powder method is, therefore, applied to trace element analysis. Since it is not efficient and time-consuming that one sample analysis requires two preparation methods, the low dilution fusion method was developed. The low dilution fusion bead technique is a method to improve sensitivity of trace elements, which enables determination of concentrations of trace elements accurately and reliably as well as major element determination by XRF. This note demonstrates advanced methods to determine the chemical composition in silicate rocks by XRF.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for continuous casting powder analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for ash analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for silicon carbide analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for continuous casting powder raw material analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for ferro alloy analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for glass analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for iron ore analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.

Calibrating XRF spectrometers for slag analysis

To use X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) quantitatively, the analytical system must be calibrated. The usual procedure begins with the purchase of reference materials as powders. These samples are prepared as, e.g., fusion beads, they are measured as calibration standards and, finally, calibration and validation are conducted. Depending on the user’s experience level, the entire method development procedure is more or less cost and time intensive. FLUXANA has spent a great deal of time with the task of reducing these costs and, thus, also the development time for the user. The results are “ready-to-go” calibration sets for various industries that have been tested and approved by laboratories wordlwide. They include different types of calibration standards based on the need of the customers, validaton samples, drift monitors, sample preparation kits and onsite calibration. The flexibility and long-term stability make those calibration sets an ideal solution for highest quality XRF analysis.